Photographic Memory

Develop Your Photographic Memory

 

Photographic Memory Course

When training yourself to get photographic memory, the first, and most important step is to make sure that your eyes are relaxed.  If you’re working with your eye muscles engaged, then you will have a lot of difficulty using your peripheral vision, effectively taking away sixty percent of your field of vision.    To relax your eyes, hold your head still and move them slowly up and down, then left to right, and try to keep your mind clear.  In about ten seconds or so, you should feel your face and eyes loosen up and be ready for action.

One of the keys to training a photographic memory is to make very effective use of your peripheral vision, and to see the whole picture of things by expanding your field of view.  Taking a wide lens when you look at a diagram allows you to take in the whole thing, and see more of the image.  Instead of focusing on a detail, try to space out your eyes and focus on a single space, but to look out through the edges of your eyes and see the perimeter. This is something that many people trying to get photographic memory struggle with, because it doesn’t seem logical to pick up details without focusing on them, but it does work.

 

The Best Way to Get Photographic Memory

The next trick is entirely mental, and that makes it very hard for some people to do, but it is the essence of how to get photographic memory.  When you are focusing on an image, no matter where you see it, fix it in your mind, and see the whole thing using the power of your peripheral vision.  Then, in order to get it wholly in your visual spectrum of memory, you need to start changing the image in your mind.

Imagine a dial that allows you to turn up the brightness and contrast of the image to a point where every detail on the page becomes defined and visible in detail.

 

Use your TV to get photographic memory

If you have trouble with this at first, don’t worry.  It takes a whole lot of practice to develop photographic memory.  Some people are born with the tools to do this, while others need to work at it.

One of the easiest ways to learn this last step is to play with your television.  Put in a movie with a vibrant, busy setting, preferably a wide-view scene, and pause it.  Then use the menu to scan through and change the brightness and contrast settings while focusing in on the picture with your eyes.  If you have trouble recalling the details now, that’s fine.  All you’re doing here is seeing what this process might look like if you were to do it mentally.